Parent's Guide:

What should my

child be learning?

Preschoolers are naturally curious learners, so while you’re at home looking to keep these busy hands and minds active, the following list of academic skills and activities can help support you! This list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your preschooler. We have also included a variety of age–appropriate activities that will entertain, educate, and engage your child! 

Math

  • Learn about numbers by counting objects
  • Sort and categorize objects
  • Learn to identify and name circles, triangles, squares, rectangles, and ovals

Literacy

  • Practice writing letters and their names
  • Listen to books read aloud
  • Start to recognize letters and their sounds
  • Draw, paint, and cut to develop fine motor skills for writing

Science

  • Use their natural curiosity
  • Explore and observe what is around them
  • Interact with and learn about nature

Social Emotional Learning

  • Help to clean up and organize
  • Start to learn to share, take turns, and cooperate
  • Practice using manners
  • Develop communication skills

Entering Kindergarten is an exciting transition as your child becomes an official student! While you’re at home looking to support your new student, the following list of academic skills and activities can help support you! This list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your kindergartner. We have also included a variety of age–appropriate activities that will entertain, educate, and engage your child! 

Math

  • Count and write numbers from 1 to 20 (and potentially higher)
  • Count, sort, and compare groups of objects up to 20
  • Use objects, drawings, actions, and sounds to solve single-digit addition and subtraction problems
  • Recognize, create, copy, and extend patterns
  • Identify the big hand and little hand on an analog clock, tell time to the hour, and understand that when the big hand is on the 12, it means “o’clock”

Literacy

  • Write and learn both uppercase and lowercase letters of the alphabet and their sounds
  • Read and listen to stories
  • Talk about stories they have read, including the characters and events
  • Recognize basic sight words and rhyming words
  • Write and draw about a variety of topics, including objects, their opinion, and things happening in their lives

Science

  • Notice what they experience with their senses
  • Learn about the world around them through observation and experimentation
  • Record observations using graphs, pictures, and words

Entering 1st grade provides your child a foundation for learning as they develop more academic skills. While you’re at home looking to engage your child, the following list of academic skills and educational activities can help support you through these crucial milestones! This list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your 1st grader.

Math

  • Count, write, add, and subtract numbers from 1 to 120
  • Uses the <, >, and = signs to compare 2-digit numbers
  • Order 3 objects by length
  • Learn the relationship between addition and subtraction, for example: 8 + 2 = 10 and 10 – 8 = 2
  • Learn to create both 2D and 3D shapes

Literacy

  • Write and learn both uppercase and lowercase letters of the alphabet and their sounds
  • Read and listen to stories
  • Talk about stories they have read, including the characters and events
  • Recognize basic sight words and rhyming words
  • Write and draw about a variety of topics, including objects, their opinion, and things happening in their lives

Science

  • Explore and experiment with the world around them with objects found at home or provided by the teacher
  • Learn facts about science topics such as: human body, ocean and sea life, animals, measurement, electricity and magnetism, sound, and matter (the difference between solids, gases, and liquids)
  • Make and record observations
  • Use their 5 senses to observe and describe changes in objects they encounter

During 2nd grade your child may be ready to advance their learning and expand their skills across subjects.  While you're at home looking to engage your child, the following list of academic skills and educational activities can help support you!  This list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your 2nd grader.

Math

  • Tell time to the quarter hour using analog and digital clocks
  • Understand the concept of multiplication (for example, 2 x 4 is 2 rows of 4)
  • Learn even and odd numbers
  • Add and subtract money with decimal points and solve equations like $1.25 + $.40 = $1.65
  • Understand a 3-digit number and break it down into groups of 100s, 10s, and 1s

Literacy

  • Read both fiction and nonfiction
  • Understand the who, what, when, where, why, and how of a text
  • Learn more grammar and punctuation such as apostrophes, create common contractions, use commas for greetings and closing, capitalize the first letters of holidays, products, and geographic names
  • Revise and edit their writing to improve it
  • Begin to use a dictionary

Science

  • Observe, ask questions, plan, and do investigations and experiments
  • Learn scientific facts about our physical world
  • Record and communicate what they experience through writing and speaking
  • Collect data and use it to support what they learn
  • Read about scientific concepts

During 3rd grade your child prepares for the transition into the ‘upper grades’ as they develop more independent learning skills. While you’re at home looking to engage your child, the following list of academic skills and educational activities can help support you and your new independent learnerThis list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your 3rd grader.

Math

  • Understand the relationship between multiplication and division up to 100 (for example 20 ÷ 2 = 10 and 2 x 10 = 20)
  • Round numbers to the nearest 10s or 100s
  • Add numbers up to 1,000
  • Understand and create fractions
  • Tell time to the half hour and quarter hour and to 5 minutes and 1 minute

Literacy

  • Read fiction, nonfiction, and poetry with expression and comprehension
  • Reread and self-correct mistakes when necessary
  • Talk about and answer questions about a text using specific examples from the text and connect different parts of a text
  • Determine the meaning of words using text and context
  • Write opinion, informative, and narrative pieces
  • Learn the functions of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs—and what role they play in a sentence

Science

  • Use the scientific process to form simple hypotheses, make predictions, and gather data to support experiments
  • Record observations and communicate what they experience through writing and speaking.
  • Understand living things, what they need (air, water, and food), and what they do (grow, move, and reproduce)
  • Experiment with different materials and different matter such as solids, liquids, and gases

Your 4th grader is officially part of the ‘upper grades’! This means they are working to deepen and expand their skills across all subject areas. While you’re at home looking to engage your child, the following list of academic skills and educational activities can help support you! This list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your 4th grader.

Math

  • Use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve word problems
  • Read and write whole numbers and understand place value into the millions
  • Multiply a number that has up to 4 digits by a 1-digit number (for example, 2,345 x 6) and multiply 2, 2-digit numbers by each other (for example, 13 x 16)
  • Add and subtract decimals and compare decimals and fractions
  • Add and subtract fractions with like denominators (the bottom number of the fraction), for example: 3/8 + 2/8 = 5/8
  • Explore algebra and learn about area by using the formula area = length x width (a = l x w)
  • Write and verbally explain their thinking behind solving math and word problems

Literacy

  • Write a paragraph with structure: an introductory topic sentence, supporting details, and a closing sentence that sums up the main idea of the paragraph
  • Use books, websites, and other digital sources to do research projects and keep track of sources to create or source list
  • After multiple readings, read aloud smoothly and with expression
  • Compare and contrast different texts about the same issue, theme, or topic
  • Use specific examples to explain characters’ motivations, main events, themes, or ideas about a text
  • Put together compound words (ex. The light of the moon is moonlight)

Science

  • Conduct experiments using the scientific method
  • Develop their science knowledge with an overview of earth, life, and physical sciences
  • Write about and present the conclusion of an experiment
  • Experiment with different materials and different matter such as solids, liquids, and gases
  • Learn what real scientists do and practice their inquiry and/or investigation skills

Your child has made it to what most consider the last year of elementary school! They sharpen, refine and grow their upper–elementary skills in preparation for middle school. While you’re at home looking to engage your child, the following list of academic skills and educational activities can help support you and your almost middle schooler! This list highlights those academic skills you can focus on at home with your 5th grader.

Math

  • Work very large to very small numbers in the form of whole numbers as well as decimals and fractions
  • Use long division to divide large numbers by multi-digit numbers
  • Use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve word problems
  • Practice using parentheses and brackets in equations; know the proper order to use to solve the equations
  • Solve real-world math problems by using problem-solving strategies
  • Plot coordinates on graphs and compare their distance and positions
  • Describe 3-dimensional shapes and find their volumes and surface areas

Literacy

  • Use root words to decipher a longer word (ex. “act” is the root word in actor, acting, reenact)
  • Begin to use direct quotes from text to explain ideas
  • Read fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama
  • Identify the parts of a story including conflict, climax, and resolution
  • Write a multiparagraph, organized composition in order with a central idea
  • Determine the meaning of an unknown word by using the context of a text

Science

  • Conduct experiments using the scientific method
  • Develop their science studies with an overview of earth, life, and physical sciences
  • Write about and present the conclusion of an experiment
  • Experiment with different materials and different matter such as solids, liquids, and gases
  • Learn what real scientists do and practice their inquiry and/or investigation skills